Review of On Point by Annabeth Albert

On Point (Out of Uniform #3)On Point by Annabeth Albert

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Had you asked me a while back, if I liked military men in romances I would have said: not really. I rarely seek them out, and yet, here I am reading and loving the third book in Annabeth Alberts Out of Uniform series and eagerly awaiting the fourth one.

On Point is a best-friends-to-lovers story. A theme I greatly enjoy when it’s done right and boy, does Ms Albert do it right! So much buildup and tension between the two, so much awkwardness and angst everywhere else but the bedroom. Because Ben and Maddox are dynamite in the bedroom, even if they find it hard to find the balance outside of it.

The start of the book is Ben and Maddox on a mission, which goes wrong, interspersed with flashbacks from the last couple of months, where their decade long friendship has taken a turn for the weird. Even though I am not normally the biggest fan of the “I almost died, so I need to take a chance on this”-trope, it worked really well here. The intensity of the experience and the aftermath of it made sense and was engaging.

This is very much a relationship driven story, with angst, hurt and comfort, which will leave you turning the pages and sighing happily at the epilogue – I even got a bit teary, I was so happy for them!

All of these books can be read as standalones, but they are all great, so don’t cheat yourself out of some great books. Happily awaiting the next in the series.

*Copy provided in exchange for an honest review*

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Review of An Unnatural Vice by K.J. Charles

An Unnatural Vice (Sins of the Cities, #2)An Unnatural Vice by K.J. Charles

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

4-4.5 stars

The second installment in KJ Charles’ Sins of the cities series is a wonderful enemies to lovers story, with two completely opposite men clashing on every page, with a great deal of angry sex to follow, but also some fantastic character growth.

Each book revolves around a new couple, but the overall mystery story arc continues, so you really need to read the series in order to get the full picture.

Justin Lazarus is know as “The seer of London”, a complete fraud and charlatan, he has no issue with manipulating and tricking people in grief, when he pretends to speak to their loved ones ‘behind the veil’. Justin knows no guilt for his actions, quite the opposite, if someone is stupid enough to pay him to lie to their face, why shouldn’t he?

When Justin is set opposite to Nathaniel Roy, whom we met in book one, the arch bishops son, a trained barrister and investigative journalist, with a strict moral code, who lost the love of his life in a freak accident, sparks fly.

The two suffer an instant mutual dislike and also a fierce mutual attraction. When the ongoing mystery and drama of the late earl’s bigamy and lost heir bring them together over and over again. The attraction wins over the dislike.

Nathaniel and Justin are great together. Everything about them is opposite. Their upbringing, their moral codex, their thoughts about friendship, love and humanity as a whole. It leads to a fascinating tale of opposites and enemies to lovers.

The plot thickens in the mystery too, and although I guessed who the lost heir was right off the bat, there are still a lot of things left unsolved for the next book. I cannot wait to read it! Warmly recommended.

I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley.com, for my reading pleasure.

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Review of Losing Control by Riley Hart

Losing Control (Broken Pieces, #3)Losing Control by Riley Hart

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I received a free copy of this audiobook from www.openskyebookreviews.com in exchange for an honest review.

Well, this was painful. Ben, our protagonist, is suffering from severe PTSD both after a recent kidnapping, which ended with murder, as well as his childhood memories of his older sister taking her own life.
He is spinning desperately out of control and into depression when we meet him. He is not working, not eating and not sleeping. All he does is drink, write letters to his ex-lover, and fuck strangers in clubs, or rather he tries to fuck strangers, except that his dick is not really co-operating any longer.
He meets Dante on such a night in a club, a mysterious stranger, who refuses to have sex with him and who takes him out for a drink, except that that drink turns out to be coffee, not alcohol. The relationship between Dante and Ben is not healthy, anyone can see that, but it does manage to keep Ben alive, something I was not certain was quite possible at the early stages of the book. Dante basically blackmails Ben into eating and sleeping, if he wants contact with him.

This book is not a happy book. It is not a light read. It is full of darkness, angst and drama. I have no idea how it compares to the two others in the series, as I have not read them, but it is not a read for a day when you want light hearted and romantic. There is no romance here. There is only desperation and need.

I would have liked more from Dante’s point of view. We spend all of the book in Ben’s head – which is not a nice place to be – but Dante is also a very broken man, and it would have been nice to see the world and their relationship through his eyes. Also I would have liked more emphasis on the relationship after they hit the wall and started coming back to life. We leave Ben and Dante in a very good and hopeful place, but my romantic little heart would have liked more assurance, that they would be ok, both as individual people and as a couple.

I had not read the first two books in this series, but didn’t feel the lack of back story was a problem at all, not until the very ending, where we were treated to glimpses of people who I had no idea who was, but that was all on me, not on the author.

Despite it’s dark and angsty feel, I am intrigued enough that I would probably go back and read the first two in the series, to get Tristan’s story too.

The narration of this book was lovely and flowed nicely. The narrator did separate voices for each character and you were never in doubt as to who was speaking. Jack DuPont was a new to me narrator, but I enjoyed his voice and his narration and would definitely buy something narrated by him again.

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Review of An Invitation by Jay Northcote

An InvitationAn Invitation by Jay Northcote

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Steamy little piece of office erotica for you. A HFN ending, but as this story is short, it is mainly just hot office sex. And really, where’s the downside?

An enjoyable night time snack, with a side of spanking, to warm your sheets before sleep.

*I received a free copy of this book from the author, for my reading pleasure*

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Review of Red Handed by Kay Simone

Red HandedRed Handed by Kay Simone

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This was a hot and steamy little piece of erotica, about a shoplifter and the security guard who catches him red handed.

It was short and filthy and very recommendable as a quick bedtime read. Due to it’s lack of length there is not much plot or character development, this was basically PWP, but very enjoyable and it does leave the reader on a HFN note.

A fun little snack of a story, which left me wanting more and will be looking up other stories from this author.
Red Handed is free for subscribers to Kay Simone’s newsletter.

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Review of David’s Selfie by Daisy Harris

David's SelfieDavid’s Selfie by Daisy Harris

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

3.5-4 stars.

This was a super sweet little christmas story about David, who is a Doctor, a widower and a single dad to 3 yr old Maia. He has devoted his entire life to his daughter and his patients and all he wants for christmas is to get laid!

He manages to wrangle a few hours to himself on a friday night, to go to a club to meet a guy he has connected with online. As he waits for his hook up, he falls madly in lust with the oiled up, gyrating go-go boy on stage, even if he realises immediately, that a man with a body like that is way out of his league. When his online hook up turns up at the bar, he is unfortunately absolutely not David’s type and he chickens out, hides in the bathroom and then quickly sneaks out, leaving his phone behind.

Craig is the go-go boy / man. He works as a dancer on weekends, and as a Zumba instructor during the week, whilst trying to finish his degree. He finds David’s phone in the bathroom and thumbs through it, trying to find it’s owner, accidentally discovering a whole lot of pictures of a cute kid and one dick pic. He likes what he sees and when the phone rings he agrees to meet in person to return the phone.

The characters in this story felt like they were real people, with flaws, which was nice. David wears glasses, was married to a woman, but never hid his bisexuality, he is not in great shape, a bit soft around the edges and hasn’t seen the inside of a gym in forever. His main priority in life is his kid, a kid which is cute, but luckily does not take over the story.
Craig has a fantastic body, toned by hours and hours of Zumba, but he is also insecure and secretive due to his past as a foster kid in the system. He hides quite a lot of things from David, but when the truth comes out, the two actually communicates about it, which was a nice touch.

There is very little angst, some steamy rough sex and a lot of sweetness in this book. We get both MC’s POV, which was nice, but the formatting in the Kindle version sometimes made that a bit abrupt, as the switch wasn’t clearly marked.

The epilogue will have you smiling, it’s so cute. Warmly recommended christmas story.

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Review of Glass Tidings by Amy Jo Cousins

Glass TidingsGlass Tidings by Amy Jo Cousins

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley.com, in exchange for an honest review.

4 solid stars for this lovely christmas story about two lonely men finding trust, love and happiness. Eddie is a drifter. He has been alone for more than a decade, after leaving the group home he grew up in, at 16. He never settles permanently, and even if he tries, things go wrong. So when he is the witness to an accident and needs to stay in a tiny town in the middle of nowhere he is not happy.

Here he becomes the house guest of Grayson, who is all about permanence. Grayson owns a shop, which has been in his family for 3 generations. He lives in a big old house in the tiny town where he grew up, drinking tea of his mother’s china, reading his father’s old books and still licking his wounds after his ex-lover left him behind years ago.

There is instant attraction between the two, but Eddie is used to sex being a method of payment and Gray is cautious of taking advantage. Slowly the two move into each others lives, working, eating, reading and living with one another. It is lovely and heartwarming.

But both men have been burned before, both are used to loneliness and isolation. Eddie is not used to staying in place and Gray is so rooted that he is destined to always being the one left behind, these differences makes it hard to trust what is plainly there for the reader to see.

The main characters felt complex and real, with depth and true emotions, the conflict made sense and the ending is lovely and hopeful. Warmly recommended.

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